Temple ruins in Halkidiki

The Temple of Poseidon

The Temple of Poseidon ©jtstewart/Flick

If you want to make a journey through the tumultuous past of Greece, Halkidiki is the ideal destination for you. Besides numerous monuments with great historical significance, museums that present the full picture of the development process and the sights of Greece with an imposing and grandiose architecture, you can visit the famous temples of the great Greek gods.

To be convinced, do not hesitate to include in your journey a visit to the Temple of Zeus, considered to be the main attraction of the peninsula. You should not miss from your holiday list to visit the Temple of Poseidon as well.

The Temple of Zeus

The Temple of Zeus ©japrea/Flick

The ruins of the temple of Zeus in Kallithea

The construction of the Temple of Zeus begun in the 2nd century by the Roman architect Cossutius, but was completed by the Greek commander, Hadrian, in the year 129. To build the temple marble was brought specially from Mount Pentelus. Initially, the temple had a length of 96 meters, it was 40 meters wide and was made of 104 columns manufactured in Corinth, which were divided into three rows, each with a height of 17 meters.

Today tourists can admire the 15 columns that are still standing after the numerous attempts to what it have been exposed, and you can also see the ruins of the columns that were damaged over time.

The ruin of the Temple of Zeus is opened to tourists from Tuesday to Sunday between 8 and 19.30 and on Mondays between 11 and 19.30. The ticket price is 4 euros for adults and for children under 6 year the entry is free.

The Temple of Zeus

The Temple of Zeus ©kbcool/Flick

Ruins of the Temple of Poseidon in Halkidiki

The Temple of Poseidon in Halkidiki was built, according to archaeologists, in the 6th century BC and it was raised by the locals to honor the god of the sea and water, Poseidon. It consistes of a small church and a sanctuary dedicated entirely to Poseidon.

The temple was built of marble, with an initial number of 34 columns that were placed on a large marble plaque that was engraved with scenes from the legends related to Poseidon. In the eastern part of the temple was graved the battle for Attica, between Poseidon and Athena, the goddess wisdom.

Due to the wind and the passing of time, until today there remained only 15 columns and 13 engraved marble plaques.

The ruins of the Temple of Poseidon can be visited every day between 9 and 20, except March. The ticket price is 4 euros for adults and 2 euros for children and students.

 

The Temple of Poseidon

The Temple of Poseidon ©jtstewart/Flick

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